Chest Exercises - Workouts

There are many exercises you can do to train the chest muscles. The well-known compound exercises such as the bench press, but also isolation exercises specifically focus on the chest muscles.

A good mix of these types of exercises is very important. Below you will find the most effective exercises to train the chest muscles. 

  1. Bench press
  2. Incline dumbbell press
  3. Dumbbell flies
  4. Dips
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Bench press

Walk into a gym, small or large, commercial or local, they will always have one thing in common. There will be at least one bench press with a barbell directly above it.

It is not surprising that the bench press is one of the most used fitness exercises for both strength trainers and bodybuilders. The exercise is extremely effective when it comes to building both strength and muscle mass. When you master the basics of the exercise well, you can gain muscle mass in the pecs, shoulders, and triceps incredibly quickly.

But are you completely new to the gym and is weightlifting also something completely new for you? Then it may be that you are not quite ready for the holy grail of fitness exercises. Sure, practice makes perfect. But having the right knowledge is very important in performing the bench press correctly.

When are you ready for the bench press?


Before you lie on the bench and start throwing heavyweights, you will first have to test whether you can check the weight of an empty bar. Most Olympic barbells used in the gym weigh exactly 20 kilograms. 

This may sound like little, depending on your weight training experience. If this weight is (too) heavy, it is wise to start with bodyweight exercises such as push-ups.

Execution of the bench press

Let's go over the basics of the bench press before moving on to advanced tips that can improve your form. Below we describe the execution of the exercise from start to finish in four simple steps. You can also watch this video where all the important points are clearly explained.


  1. Lie flat on the couch with a slight bend in your lower back
  2. Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width on the bar, which means that when you lower the bar, your hands are exactly above the elbows. In this position, you can generate maximum power.
  3. Slowly and controlled lower the bar to your chest as you inhale. The bar may or may not touch the chest, depending on your mobility.
  4. Push the bar up as you exhale. Try to teach yourself to look at a fixed point on the ceiling, not the rod itself.
Well, sounds easy, doesn't it? In reality, it often happens that a serious shoulder or chest injury is sustained during the bench press. Prevention is better than cure, so be sure to leave your ego at home when you hit the gym and practice the proper technique before increasing the weight.


Tips for beginners

Whether the exercise is new to you, or if you've been doing it for years, refreshing your knowledge and checking your form never hurts. We will go through several basic tips that will help you during the exercise.

1. Contact points

  • Your feet are constantly on the ground. Place your feet directly under or behind your knees, don't let them hang forward. Press your feet against the floor constantly so that your glutes and hamstrings are slightly tense.
  • Your head remains pressed against the bench throughout the exercises. Teach yourself not to look at the bar during the exercises, this will put your head and neck in the wrong position.
  • Your shoulder blades are fully drawn together and pushed back. Picture yourself constantly trying to squeeze a coin between your shoulder blades. You hold this position throughout the exercise.
  • By keeping a slight bend in your lower back, your buttocks/hips along with your head and shoulder blades are the three contact points on the bench itself.

2. Positioning

  • Your eyes should be directly under the bar. This way you can measure whether you are at the right height of the sofa. When you stretch your arms while lying on the bench, the bar should be about the same height as your wrists. If the bar is higher, make sure that the starting position of the bar is lowered.
  • For most people, placing the hands shoulder-width apart is best.

3. Taking out and putting back the barbell

  • If you are not entirely sure about the amount of weight hanging from the barbell, be sure to use a spotter. No spotter at your disposal? Then make sure you stop the exercise at least two repetitions before failure. This way you can safely replace the barbell.
  • Bring the barbell directly over your shoulders when you remove it from the rack, keeping your arms fully extended until then.
  • Lower the barbell in a controlled manner about the height of the nipples. Then push up until your arms are fully extended again.
  • Are you ready? Slowly move the barbell back to the correct height. Keep tension on the barbell until you are sure it is in a safe position.

Most Common Beginner Mistakes

To get the most out of your bench press, you really want to avoid the following mistakes as much as possible. We may call it beginner mistakes, but we see it all too often with experienced weightlifters. If you want to avoid these mistakes, you will have to be aware of them. This does not happen all at once, of course, but keep consciously paying attention to your form and execution, and eventually, it will come naturally.

1. Going too heavy

As we said before, leave your ego at home when you go to the gym. When you start pressing more weight than you can actually handle, your shape will decrease so that you can still get the weight up. This puts you at great risk of shoulder and other muscle injuries. 

2. Don't Squeeze Shoulder Blades

With the bench press, you want your shoulder blades to stay in exactly the same position throughout the exercise. This may sound easy and logical, but we often see as the exercise gets heavier, the shoulder blades get more and more out of position.

3. Feet that move

Just like your shoulder blades, your feet also stay in the same position all the time. If your feet move or change position during the set, it means you're not squeezing yourself into the bench enough. Plant your feet flat on the floor and keep constant pressure from your feet through your hamstrings and glutes.

4. Constantly adjust the grip width

The width of your grip has a huge influence on which muscles are responsible for performing the lift. When you place your hands 1 centimeter more inwards, your triceps will be loaded for a significantly greater part. Try to find the ideal width for you where you feel most comfortable. When you have found this width, keep it for a longer period of time.

5. Not touching the chest correctly

There are several ways to get this wrong. This could be by bouncing the barbell off the chest and using momentum to push the weight up. You may also be lowering the barbell way too high on your chest. In this way, you put the shoulder muscles and shoulder joints in a vulnerable position.

Last and perhaps the most common: not touching the chest with the barbell. If you can't get the barbell to touch your chest, lower the weight. The full range of motion is important to activate as many muscle fibers in the chest as possible.

6. Using a 'thumbless' grip

There is nothing more dangerous than using a thumbless grip while bench pressing, yet many bodybuilders use it. This grip is nicknamed the “suicide grip” for a reason. Because the thumbs are not around the barbell, there is a possibility that the barbell can roll out of your hands.

The perfect form during the bench press

To achieve the maximum strength gains, the amount of weight comes in number two as the determining factor. The focus should first be on creating the most stable possible base and perfect execution of the exercise.

When the execution is perfect, you also get the most out of the exercise. In this way, you ensure that only the muscles that have to do the work actually do the work.

1. The perfect grip

As we discussed earlier, the width of the grip plays a big part in performing the bench press. The close grip bench press shifts the focus more to the triceps. A wider grip puts more strain on the chest and shoulders. If the grip is too wide, the shoulders will be in a vulnerable position more quickly.

2. Bend in your lower back

A bend in your lower back is definitely recommended during the bench press. Of course, you want to avoid lying flat and relaxed on the couch. By using a so-called “arch” in your lower back, it is easier to push your shoulder blades and hips into the bench. It feels like you bury this completely in the sofa, while you push yourself backward from your feet. In this way, you completely tighten the whole body before you start the exercise.

3. Keep your elbows in

We haven't talked about the position of the elbows yet. Try to keep your elbows as close to your sides as possible as you lower the weight. Doing this also removes unnecessary tension from your shoulders and reduces the risk of shoulder injuries. In addition, you are also a lot stronger with your elbows in this position than if you let them point outwards.

4. DO NOT look at the barbell

It is wise to train yourself from the beginning to look at a fixed point on the ceiling when you perform the exercise. It is often attractive to keep an eye on whether you are balancing the weight completely. In most cases, this will cause your head to lift off the bench, making it more difficult to keep your shoulder blades in the desired position.

Incline dumbbell press

The incline dumbbell press is one of the exercises you see all too often done in the gym and for a reason. It's a variation of the incline bench press, but using dumbbells brings unique benefits.

Here we cover everything you need to know before performing the exercise. The exercise is very effective, but only if you know how to perform it correctly. How? We'll tell you that below!

Dumbell workout chest

The incline dumbbell press is a so-called “free weight” exercise, which focuses on taxing the chest, shoulders, and triceps.

Unlike other traditional chest exercises, such as the flat bench press, the incline dumbbell press focuses on the upper chest muscles. In chest exercises with an "incline" (an angle of 15 to 30 degrees), there is more activation in the upper muscle fibers of the chest muscles. dumbell workout chest

It is an effective fitness exercise to achieve strength gain and muscle growth in the chest. The exercise can be used during your chest training, upper body training, or push training, depending on your training plan. dumbell workout chest

When are you ready for the incline dumbbell press?

The incline dumbbell press is an exercise for intermediate or advanced weight lifters. This is because a good execution requires quite a bit of balance and concentration. If you are performing the exercise for the first time, don't expect everything to go smoothly right away, this takes time.

An advantage of the incline dumbbell press, as opposed to the bench press, is the choice in weight. Where the bench press starts at 20 kilograms, you can start as low as you want with the incline dumbbell press. Also, use this and make sure you first master the performance with a lower weight before increasing the weight.



Practice makes perfect, that certainly applies to the incline dumbbell press. Balancing the dumbbells demands a lot from your stabilizers. These muscles work to balance the weight. Below we describe the exercise in four simple steps. 

  • Pick up the dumbbells from the floor and keep them in a neutral position (palms facing each other). Rest the dumbbells on the top of your thighs, close to your hips, and sit on the edge of the bench.
  • Slowly lower your body back until your backrests are on the bench, keeping the dumbbells close to your chest. Push your shoulder blades together and back so that you are fully seated on the bench.
  • You are currently in the starting position. From this position, push the dumbbells up and make sure your elbows don't point out too much. When your arms are fully extended, consciously squeeze your chest. Then slowly and controlled lower the weight until you are back in the starting position.
  • Repeat this movement for the desired number of reps. When you notice that you can no longer keep the shoulder blades in the desired position, it is wise to end the set.

Tip: Lower the dumbbells far enough! It is tempting not to let the dumbbells come all the way down, this makes the exercise a lot easier and ensures that you can push a heavier weight. 

A full range of motion is essential during the incline dumbbell press. In the lower part of the exercise, the muscle fibers are fully stretched and activated. Lower the dumbbells until your palms are about level with your chest, as long as it feels comfortable. If this doesn't work, lower the weight.

Helpful Tips - dumbell workout chest

We have gone through the execution of the exercises in four different steps. Once you've mastered this process, there are a few more tips you can use to perfect your form and execution.
  • Just don't fully extend your arms when you push the dumbbells up. If you keep a very slight bend in your arms, you make sure that the pressure remains constant on the chest muscles and not transferred to your elbows.
  • Don't let your elbows point out too much. Keeping your elbows close to your sides reduces the risk of shoulder injuries.
  • Don't bump the dumbbells together as you push them up. This can cause you to get out of position.
  • Keep a slight bend in your lower back, this makes your buttocks/hips along with your head and shoulder blades the three contact points on the bench itself.
  • Constantly squeeze your shoulder blades together and push them down and back so that they are locked into the bench.
  • If you feel pain in your shoulder, it may be that your shoulder blades are not pulled back enough. Imagine yourself constantly trying to squeeze a dollar coin between your shoulder blades.
  • Place your feet flat on the floor and do not move them during the exercise. Your entire lower body remains in the same position throughout the set.

Most Common Beginner Mistakes

The incline dumbbell press may look fairly simple at first glance. Make no mistake, the exercise is by no means simple! Because the exercise looks simple, it is easy to quickly overlook several bad habits. Read here what the most common mistakes are and how you can prevent them.

1. Going too heavy

A mistake that applies to all fitness exercises; go too heavy. It is also important to leave your ego behind with the incline dumbbell press. When the weight is (too) heavy, the exercise can still be performed, but this is often at the expense of form.

2. Don't Squeeze Shoulder Blades

We mentioned squeezing the shoulder blades together because it is the most common mistake made in chest exercises.

Squeeze your shoulder blades together and push them back so that your chest rises. In this way, your chest is mainly loaded during the exercise and you reduce the risk of shoulder injuries.

3. Not going deep enough

A full range of motion is important if you want to fully activate the muscle fibers. In the lower part of the movement, your chest muscles are stretched and therefore loaded. When you stop the dumbbells halfway through the movement and push upwards, you cannot optimally stretch the muscle fibers in the chest.

4. Making the weight of the chest "bounce"

You've probably seen it. Someone who lowers the dumbbells at high speed and uses momentum at the bottom of the movement to push the weight back up.

By using momentum you can often push more weight up because your chest muscles are less stressed in this way. If your goal is to press as heavy a weight as possible, you can try this. Is your goal to stimulate the muscle fibers in your chest as effectively as possible? Then be sensible and carry out the exercise in a controlled manner.

Safety and Precautions

The most important thing to remember when performing the incline dumbbell press is to choose the right amount of weight. This is probably less than you think, especially if you do the exercise correctly. Doing 8 to 12 reps should be doable. Isn't this okay? Then lower the weight.

In general, the incline dumbbell press is a fairly safe exercise, but it does require a certain amount of strength and experience. If you are completely new to performing fitness exercises, it is wiser to start with machines and bodyweight exercises. Aspects such as good posture and the movement pattern you learn when performing these exercises can be transferred to the incline dumbbell press.

The incline dumbbell press can be a tricky exercise for people who suffer from shoulder pain. If you are someone who has long-term shoulder complaints, first try chest exercises such as the bench press or machine press. When you feel a sharp pain in the shoulder, always stop the exercise immediately and try other exercises where this is not the case.

Dumbbell fly For Chest Workout


Dumbbell flys are often used to end a chest or push workout. You may have heard it before, a "fly" exercise such as the dumbbell fly is indispensable for fully training the chest.

The fly is one of the few chest exercises where the chest is completely isolated by sidelining the shoulders and triceps. We still regularly see the correct execution of the exercise. Below we explain how you can prevent this and what you should pay attention to.

Doing heavy press exercises such as the bench press or an incline dumbbell press is certainly effective for training the chest, but these exercises also tax all kinds of other muscle groups. If you want to isolate the chest muscles as effectively as possible, you will almost always end up with a fly variant.

With the dumbbell fly, you load all muscle fibers in the chest. Mainly the muscle fibers that are attached to the sternum. A fly exercise is therefore particularly suitable for creating muscle separation and definition in the chest.   

Am I ready for the dumbbell fly?


The dumbbell fly is an exercise suitable for intermediate and advanced trainers. If you are completely new to the gym, we recommend that you first become familiar with the movement by using a pec deck machine or cables to perform the exercise.

When you have a good feel for the movement and position of your arms, you are ready for the dumbbell fly. Just make sure you use a weight that is easy to control. As mentioned before; the dumbbell fly is intended to isolate the chest muscles. If you find that you can't constantly keep the position in your body and bend in your arms the same, decrease the weight.




The dumbbell fly is considered a classic bodybuilding exercise and was named by Arnold Schwarzenegger as one of the most effective exercises for training the chest.

The purpose of the exercise is not so much to increase strength. It is mainly used in bodybuilding training schemes where the focus is on muscle hypertrophy.

We take you through our step-by-step plan for correctly performing the exercise.

  • Pick the dumbbells off the floor with a neutral grip (palms facing each other). Rest the dumbbells on the top of the thighs while sitting on the bench.
  • Lean back until your back touches the bench. Keep the dumbbells constantly close to your chest as you move towards the bench.
  • From this position, push the dumbbells straight up with your arms fully extended with your shoulder blades squeezing and pushing back. This is your starting position.
  • From the starting position, create a slight bend in your elbows so that your arms are not fully extended and stretched. From here you slowly lower the dumbbells outwards while the bend in your elbow remains constant.
  • When the dumbbells are level with your chest line, reverse the movement and bring the dumbbells back up. Consciously tighten your chest muscles as you bring the dumbbells together.
  • Make sure the dumbbells don't bump into each other but bring them back to the starting position. Perform the desired number of reps until the set is complete.

Tip: Build up the weight slowly and in small steps. The exercise demands a lot from your shoulder joints, which creates a risk of shoulder injuries when using too heavyweight.

Helpful Tips

You have now read how you can and should perform the exercise correctly, of course, does not mean that you will succeed in one go. As is the case with many fitness exercises; practice makes perfect.

Before you really master the dumbbell fly, you will have to practice it for a longer period of time. We do have a number of handy tips for you that will absolutely help you while performing the dumbbell fly.
  • Imagine that you are hugging a tree while performing the exercise.
  • Try not to squeeze the handles of the dumbbells too hard. If you do this, your biceps and forearms will play a greater role in shifting the weight.
  • Make sure that the dumbbells don't bump into each other, this can cause you to get out of position, creating a risk of injury.
  • Keep a slight bend in your elbows at all times. Lower the weight as far as you feel comfortable. If you feel pain or pressure in your shoulder joints, you are probably lowering the weight too deeply.
  • If you feel a sharp pain in your shoulder during the exercise, your shoulder blades may be out of position. Squeeze your shoulder blades together and push into the bench as your chest sticks out.
  • Your feet are constantly flat on the floor and never move during the set.

Most Common Beginner Mistakes

The dumbbell fly is an exercise where mistakes are easily made. This is because opinions about the perfect execution differ quite a bit.

One goes deeper than the other and the other has more bend in the elbow than the other. One is not necessarily better than the other. The main thing is that you listen to your body and perform the exercise without causing pain, especially in the shoulder joints.

However, there are a number of common mistakes that are easy to avoid.

1. Going too heavy

This mistake is relevant to almost any fitness exercise, but it is especially important with the dumbbell fly. The exercise is intended to isolate the pectoral muscle. Going too heavy will cause muscles like the shoulders and biceps to help shift the weight.

Increase the weight in small increments and only increase as long as you can maintain constant tension on the pectoral muscle. If you feel pain in your shoulder joints, lower the weight immediately.

2. Using arms instead of chest

Another common mistake is using muscles in the arms instead of the chest.

Many people focus on bringing the hands together, using muscles in the biceps and forearms. Try to imagine that you bring your elbows together. This will activate your chest muscles much better so that your arms play a secondary role during the dumbbell fly.

3. Lowering the weight too deep

Deeper is not better, especially when doing the dumbbell fly. As long as the pressure and stress on the pectoral muscles remain, you're fine. A good guideline is to stop when the dumbbells are level with your chest.

Going much deeper than this will transfer the pressure and stress to your shoulder joints. This puts you at unnecessary risk of shoulder 
injuries and the muscles in your chest are less effective.

Safety and Precautions

With chest exercises such as the dumbbell fly, a safe execution is important. The shoulder joints are very vulnerable and if your posture is not quite right you just have a shoulder injury.

The first and absolutely most important precaution is: don't lift too heavily. It is logical that your form and execution are not immediately perfect. Therefore, use lighter weights until your technique is good. Then slowly increase in weight as long as this does not affect your form and technique.

Dips

The dip is a compound exercise, often used during chest, push, or upper body training. The exercise works several muscles in the chest, shoulders, and triceps. This makes the exercise a great all-around muscle mass builder for the upper body.

For many, the bench press remains the first choice when it comes to training the chest, this is not always justified. The dip is a great exercise, but only if you know how to do it properly. We tell you how!

Am I ready for dips?

Bodyweight dips are generally an exercise suitable for intermediate and advanced trainers. Because the exercise is performed with bodyweight, the intensity depends on the weight of the person.

If you are not sure whether you have enough strength in your upper body to perform the dip correctly and safely, try the assisted dip first. During the exercise, your shoulders are in a vulnerable position. It is therefore very important that you can perform the exercise slowly and in a controlled manner. This reduces the risk of injuries.

Dips are performed with bodyweight, this can make the exercise heavy or light, depending on the person. For this reason, there are several variations of dips. For example, you can do “ weighted dips ”, where you have extra weight hanging around your waist to make the exercise heavier. Another variant is " assisted dips ", where a machine or training partner supports you in order to make the exercise lighter.

Dip variations: chest & triceps

What many people don't know is that the dip can actually be performed in two different ways. Dips can be divided into chest dips and tricep dips. The two exercises are similar but different. By keeping your body in a slightly different position, you ensure that the emphasis is mainly on the chest, or on the triceps.

Chest dips

The chest dip is one of the best muscle mass-building exercises for the chest muscles. If you mainly want to use dips to train your chest, the chest dip is one of your go-to's!

By leaning slightly forward during the dip, you transfer a lot of tension from the triceps to the chest muscles. Because you lean more forward, your legs will automatically move backward. Read here everything about performing the chest dip in a correct and safe way.

Triceps dips

With the tricep dip, you actually do the opposite as with the chest dip. By keeping your body in as straight a position as possible, you transfer most of the pressure directly to your triceps.

In general, the tricep dip is a slightly heavier variant to perform. Are you your arms and training and do you want to use the dip mainly to train your triceps? The tricep dip is definitely one of your best choices in this case. Read here what you need to know about the execution and technique when doing the tricep dip.


Performance of chest dips workout

The chest dip is a very suitable exercise to stimulate the muscle fibers in the chest. In addition, you indirectly train muscles in the triceps and shoulders.

Chest dips mainly focus on the lower part of the chest muscle, similar to a decline bench press. The chest dip is performed with a vertical movement pattern. Because other press exercises have a horizontal movement pattern, you create a unique stimulus in the chest muscles with the chest dip.

In order to shift the focus from the triceps to the chest as much as possible, there are a number of points that you will have to pay attention to while doing the exercise.

  • Position yourself in front of the dip station and place your hands on the handles with a neutral grip.
  • Begin the exercises by pushing yourself up onto the station with your elbows in a straight position.
  • Cross your legs and bring them back while leaning your upper body forward.
  • From this position, slowly lower your body while keeping your elbows at your sides.
  • Lower the elbow until an angle of about 45 degrees is formed, then push your body back up to the starting position from this position.
  • Repeat the movement until the desired number of reps of the set is achieved.

Tip: Keep the entire body in a constant slant position to transfer as much tension from the triceps as possible to the chest.

Performing triceps dips

The tricep dip is a very suitable compound exercise for building muscle mass in the tricep.

Tricep dips are one of the few exercises in which all heads of the triceps (long, lateral, and medial head) are intensively loaded. This makes the tricep dip a great exercise for training the entire tricep.

To shift the focus from the pectoral muscles to the triceps as much as possible, it is important to keep the body in an upright position.

  • Position yourself in front of the dip station and place your hands on the handles with a neutral grip.
  • Begin the exercises by pushing yourself up onto the station with your elbows in a fully extended position.
  • Cross your legs and keep your legs constantly under your torso in a dead straight position.
  • From this position, slowly lower your body while keeping your elbows at your sides.
  • Lower the elbow until an angle of about 45 degrees is formed, then push your body back up to the starting position from this position.
  • Repeat the movement until the desired number of reps of the set is achieved.

Tip: Keeping your body in an upright position and not leaning forward directly loads the triceps during the exercise.

Helpful Tips


Okay, now we know how to use the dip to directly train our triceps and chest. For this, we have a number of useful tips that can help you with the implementation, but also play an important role when it comes to safety.

These tips apply to both the tricep dip and chest dip!

  • Do not lower your body too far while performing the dip, as this can cause unnecessary irritation to the shoulder joint.
  • Be mentally aware of the muscle you want to train during the exercise. Are you doing a chest dip? Then make sure that you consciously push the bodyweight upwards from your chest muscles.
  • Do not fully extend your elbows at the top of the exercise, but keep a slight bend.
  • Perform reps slowly and in a controlled manner. This allows you to better focus on the muscles you want to load and you reduce the risk of injury because you have control over the movement.

Is the exercise too heavy or too light?

You perform dips by moving your body weight. How heavy and intensive the exercise is, therefore, depends entirely on the person himself. Someone with more muscle mass and less fat mass will probably experience the exercise as light faster than someone with just mentioned reversed.

Because the difficulty and intensity of the dip are subjective to the person, there are two variants. The weighted dip makes the exercise heavier and the assisted dip makes the exercise lighter.

weighted dip

The weighted dip is a variant of both the chest and tricep dip. The principle is quite simple. The exercise is made heavier by adding extra weight.

Adding extra weight can be done in two ways. One of these ways is to clamp a dumbbell between the legs. The disadvantage is that this is only possible with relatively lower weights. The second way is to use a dip belt. By means of a belt that is around the waist, weight discs can be attached to a chain. This way you can add large amounts of weight.

assisted dip

Assisted dips are an ideal dip variant when the normal dip is too heavy for you. The assisted dip means that the total resistance is reduced by means of counterweight.

An assisted dip can be performed in two ways. One of these ways is with a training partner or spotter. Someone who grabs you by your legs or ankles and gives you constant pressure upwards. The second option and best option is to use an assisted dip machine. If your gym has this machine, make sure to use it!

Most Common Beginner Mistakes

Mistakes are easily made when doing an exercise like dips. Many can be prevented with the right knowledge. Others can be prevented with more frequent practice and better control.

We'll take you through the most common mistakes we see when doing dips and how to easily avoid them.

1. Not knowing which dip variant you are doing

As we have discussed extensively, the dip consists of two different variants; the chest dip and the triceps dip. Be aware in advance of which variant you are going to perform so that you know exactly how to position your body.

By knowing which variant you do, you also know which muscle you can focus on mentally. Sure, the chest and triceps will both have to work hard during the exercise but try to focus on one of them as much as possible.

2. The exercise is too hard

Another error that we encounter all too often. Continuing to do dips when the exercise is actually too strenuous, creating unnecessary risks.

Are you unable to achieve at least 8 repetitions per set, or are you unable to perform the exercise in a controlled manner? If this is the case with you, first try an assisted dip until you have built up the necessary strength to perform a chest or tricep dip.

3. Bad elbow position

As mentioned before, the position of your elbows during the dip is very important. If your elbow points out too much, tension will be shifted from the triceps to the shoulders. Because your shoulder joints are in a vulnerable position, you want to put as little stress on them as possible during the dip.

Make sure your elbows are constantly at your sides and not pointing out.

Safety and Precautions

We've talked enough about safety when performing the dip. Safety in this exercise is so important, as your shoulders are in a constantly vulnerable position.

If you want to reduce the risk of injury, there are a number of precautions you can take. The main ones are:

  • Keep your elbows at your sides constantly, don't let them point out.
  • Perform the exercise slowly and in a controlled manner. If this does not work, first try an assisted dip until it succeeds.
  • Do not lower your body too deeply, so you avoid unnecessary irritation to your shoulder joints.
Good Luck!